Community

We strive to fulfill our mission as a land-grant university by serving the citizens of our community and state—and increasingly, our nation and world. Our efforts extend beyond the campus and into our community through many partnerships, ranging from an annual statewide high school science and humanities symposium to scholarship programs to recruit and retain students from underserved populations.

In the Knoxville community, faculty and graduate students in sports psychology help local girls develop good exercise habits and healthy self-images; our College of Law performs pro bono work for underserved clients; and our Veterinary Social Work program supports pet owners during care for their animals.

In the US, UT strives to help combat hunger, homelessness, natural disaster destruction, and poverty from Appalachia, through the South, to the Great Lakes, and Washington, DC.

Our students also take part in community improvement projects around the world including medical missions in Guatemala, farming and gardening sustainability in Uganda and Jamaica, and potable water system creation in Peru.

Students also lead the way in giving back to the community by volunteering with organizations such as the Boys & Girls Club, Habitat for Humanity, the Special Olympics of Greater Knoxville, the Knox County Read With Me children’s literacy program, the Ronald McDonald House, and East Tennessee Children’s Hospital.

But our interaction with the community does not simply flow outward; members of the public have free access to many of UT’s cultural and academic resources, including the Frank H. McClung Museum, the UT Gardens, music recitals, and public lectures.

Our Center for Business and Economic Impact recently estimated that UT has an economic impact of more than $800 million on the state, accounting not only for direct expenditures by the university, but also the multiplied impact of things like spending by employees, jobs created by research funding, and more. The university’s partnership with Battelle Memorial Institute to manage Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will continue to attract leading researchers in the sciences to conduct their work in Tennessee.

UT contributes to every aspect of life, and we continue to move forward in our mission to be the preeminent public research and teaching university linking the people of Tennessee to the community, the nation, and the world.

Community News

Science Forum Concludes with Green Locomotives

Pete Claussen, founder and CEO of Gulf and Ohio Railways Inc. and Knoxville Locomotive Works, will present "Green Locomotives" on Friday at this semester's final Science Forum. The weekly brown-bag lunch series allows professors and area scientists to discuss their research with the general public in a conversational presentation. The Science Forum begins at noon in Room C-D of Thompson-Boling Arena. Attendees can bring lunch or purchase it at the arena. It is free and open to the public.


Partial Closure of Circle Drive Set for Saturday

A portion of Circle Drive on the Hill will be closed to traffic early in the morning of Saturday, April 26, as workers transport roofing materials for Dabney-Buehler Hall. The road will be closed east of Ayres Hall, with the western portion converted to two-way traffic to allow accessible parking and deliveries on the Hill.


UT Honors Sevier, Davidson County Educators for Excellence in Leadership

Two principals from Sevier County and Davidson County, respectively, are the latest recipients of awards that recognize outstanding education leaders in the state. Benjamin T. Clabo, principal of Pigeon Forge High School in Sevier County, is the recipient of the University Council for Educational Administration Excellence in Educational Leadership Award. J. Terry Shrader, principal at Hillsboro High School in Davidson County, has received the William J. and Lucille H. Field Award for Excellence in Secondary Principalship for the State of Tennessee.


CURENT Honored with Spot In USA Science and Engineering Festival

The National Science Foundation area of the USA Science and Engineering Festival will have a UT feel thanks to a spot in the prestigious event going to CURENT, the Center for Ultra-Wide-Area Resilient Electric Energy Transmission Networks. Housed in the Min H. Kao Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Building in UT's College of Engineering, CURENT is a UT-led multi-institution research group focused on making the electrical grid more efficient, particularly in the area of energy transportation.


Confucius Institute Brings Top Musician to Perform April 24

First-ranking Chinese musician Xiaojun Huo will perform "A Harmony of Strings" on April 24 at UT. The performance begins at 1:30 p.m. in the University Center auditorium, and is free and open to the public. Huo is the first-ranking erhu player in China. The erhu is a two-stringed bowed musical instrument that originated in China and is known in the western world as the "Chinese violin."


Top Washington Journalist to Talk about New Book at UT’s Baker Center

POLITICO senior writer Todd Purdum will talk about his new book—An Idea Whose Time Has Come: Two Presidents, Two Parties and the Battle for the Civil Rights Act of 1964—on Wednesday, April 23, at the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy. Purdum's talk will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Toyota Auditorium of the Baker Center. Afterward, he will sign copies of his book, which will be for sale on site.


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